How Do You Decode A Simple Entry in the Transaction Log? (Part 1)

how do you find the derivative

There is always a lot of interest in reading log records within SQL, although when you start getting into it you soon realise that it is an undocumented quagmire and quickly decide that there are better things you can do with your time.

It has taken a non-trivial amount of time to decode and has created a long documented process, so it will be in two parts, so I should caveat this undertaking with two clear statements first:

  • There is no real reason you want to go poking around in the log except for ‘interest value’ – if you need to actually properly read log files then as you are about to see, using commercial applications will look very cheap in comparison to the time you would spend trying to do this. Even better – make sure you have proper backup’s so that you never need to try retrieve rows from the file!
  • There is basically very little external documentation to guide you in reading an entry, I am learning it by doing it, and using what little documentation there is, along with trying some

    logical deductions and good understanding of internals from training – it is designed to act as an example of figuring the log entry out, but also demonstrating that this is not trivial and not something you will want to do.

That said, let’s start by trying to work out a single log record.

Using the adventure works example database, I have set it into fully logged mode and taken a backup to ensure that the transaction log is being used correctly. I’ve removed the foreign key constraints and triggers on the HumanResources.EmployeeTable, since I want to be able to delete a row and not trip over the example FK’s and trigger that prevents deletion.

To get to the log file values out, I am using the following snippet of SQL:

On initial inspection the log has only a not too many rows, altering the Diff Map, File Header etc. So I issue the command to delete a single row from the table.

And then select the contents of the log, and I have copied some of the fields from the output:


Category: Bank

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