What is the gdp of kenya

what is the gdp of kenya

Feed the Future Country Fact Sheet

Agriculture is the backbone of Kenya's economy and central to its development strategy

Kenya has the largest, most diversified economy in East Africa. Agriculture is the backbone of Kenya’s economy and central to the Government of Kenya’s development strategy. More than 75 percent of Kenyans make some part of their living in agriculture, and the sector accounts for more than a fourth of Kenya’s gross domestic product (GDP).

Agriculture is the backbone of Kenya's economy and central to its development strategy

Kenya has the largest, most diversified economy in East Africa. Agriculture is the backbone of Kenya’s economy and central to the Government of Kenya’s development strategy. More than 75 percent of Kenyans make some part of their living in agriculture, and the sector accounts for more than a fourth of Kenya’s gross domestic product (GDP).

While agricultural productivity is stagnating, Kenya’s population is growing. This poses critical challenges to food security in the country as two million to four million people receive food aid annually. Only about 20 percent of Kenyan land is suitable for farming, and maximum yields have not been reached in these areas, leaving considerable potential for increases in productivity. Most farmers work without basic agricultural inputs or updated technology and lack adequate financial or extension services.

Even though malnutrition indicators are improving, it is estimated that from 2010 to 2030, undernutrition will cost Kenya approximately $38.3 billion in GDP due to losses in workforce productivity.

While the challenges are great, so are the opportunities. With the largest dairy herd in east and southern Africa, Kenya has the potential to meet local demand for dairy and target regional markets. As one of the largest African exporters of fresh produce to Europe, Kenya’s horticulture industry can expand domestic, regional and international markets. Markets, in turn, can significantly grow through reforms that address standards and quality, policy constraints, irrigation, roads, agricultural inputs, extension, and market access promotion.

Persistent crises, such as drought in Kenya’s arid lands, exacerbate the vulnerability of basic livelihoods. In response, the U.S. Government has layered humanitarian and development assistance to build resilience and expand economic opportunities in these areas through disaster risk reduction; conflict mitigation; natural resource management; and strengthening the livestock, dairy and other vital sectors.

Feed the Future is helping Kenya capitalize on these opportunities in agriculture to meet the country’s food security and nutrition challenges.

Goal: Reduce the prevalence of poverty in Feed the Future target regions by 20 percent.

Goal: Reduce the prevalence of children suffering from stunting in Feed the Future target regions by 20 percent.

To achieve its goals, Feed the Future is making key investments to:

  • Promote value chain growth and diversification
  • Increase incomes
  • Enhance food security
  • Increase resilience to climatic and economic shocks and stressors
  • Improve the nutritional status of women and children

Feed the Future is focusing its efforts in targeted regions and value chains to maximize impact.

  • Horticulture
  • Dairy
  • Maize, Staples and Drought-Tolerant Crops
  • Livestock

Target Regions

The Feed the Future target regions cover 27 of Kenya’s 47 counties, categorized below by agro-climatic zones. The target counties comprise more than 50 percent of Kenya’s population. In these regions, more than half of the population lives below the poverty line.

Western Region Counties, high-rainfall zone

  • Trans Nzoia, Elgeyo-Marakwet, Uasin Gishu, Nandi, Kisumu, Kericho, Nyamira, Bomet, Kisii, Homabay, Migori, Siaya, Vihiga, Kakamega, Busia, Bungoma

Eastern Region Counties, semi-arid zone

  • Meru, Tharaka-Nithi, Kitui, Machakos, Makueni, Taita-Taveta

Northern Kenya Counties, arid and semi-arid zone

  • Turkana, Marsabit, Isiolo, Wajir, Garissa

Program Highlights

Value Chain Approach. Feed the Future is focusing its efforts on improving several key agricultural value chains in Kenya: horticulture, dairy, maize and other staples for the high rainfall areas; drought-tolerant staple crops (sorghum/millet and root crop systems), drought-tolerant maize, horticulture and pulses for the semi-arid areas; and livestock and dairy in arid and semi-arid lands of northern Kenya. Feed the Future addresses the whole value chain with a special focus on the weakest “links,” from inputs like fertilizer, seeds, and livestock vaccines to credit, production methods, storage, transport, processing, farmers’ cooperatives, and markets in Kenya, East Africa and overseas.

Policy. To enhance food security and reduce poverty, the U.S. Government works with the Government of Kenya and the East African Community on national and regional policies, including trade policy reforms, to reduce high tariffs on grain imports. Feed the Future also works with the Tegemeo Institute of Agricultural Policy and Development at Egerton University and Michigan State University to study agricultural policy issues and to advocate key reforms in the sector.

Finance. Feed the Future is expanding smallholder farmers’ access to rural and farm financing through local Kenyan financial institutions. These institutions not only develop and deliver financial products for the rural poor in targeted value chains but also leverage the largest portfolio of loan guarantees in the world through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Development Credit Authority .

Science and Technology. The United States supports the Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization, collaboration with international research organizations, and crop variety research for the semi-arid zone, including research on improved seeds, pest control and food safety for maize, sorghum, millet, sweet potato, cowpea and pigeon pea. Feed the Future, through a U.S. Department of Agriculture and USAID partnership, is working with the Kenya Plant Health Inspectorate Services to increase the quality and availability of drought-tolerant crops and varieties that build resilience to the effects of climate change. Kenya is part of collaborative research efforts to control a highly virulent wheat stem rust disease, improve goat productivity, address livestock diseases, and reduce the occurrence of aflatoxin fungus in maize.

Partnerships. Feed the Future is investing in innovative private sector strategies to enhance food security and nutrition through its Kenya Feed the Future Innovation Engine project. The project is identifying new technologies

with the potential to benefit smallholder farmers and Kenyan households. The project will test these innovations and then help scale selected game-changing agricultural technologies and approaches to help farmers increase food production and improve their access to markets.

Women and Youth. Feed the Future supports activities that empower women and improve the nutritional status of women and children. Women manage an estimated 44 percent of Kenya’s smallholder households and are active at every point in the food chain. Their contribution is significant as their harvests, particularly from home gardens, provide essential nutrients for families. These harvests are often the only food available during the lean seasons or when the main harvest fails. Feed the Future’s training activities promote women’s leadership in business and producer organizations, particularly in horticulture crops where women predominate. Feed the Future is also engaging Kenyan youth in farming, processing and trading to relieve high levels of youth unemployment.

Nutrition. Reducing undernutrition will help address the cycle of poverty in Kenya. With Feed the Future’s support, the Government of Kenya has established a National Food and Nutrition Security Policy to provide an overarching framework that addresses these challenges. Feed the Future is collaborating with health partners in Kenya to promote the incorporation of more nutrient-dense foods into diets and the adoption of improved nutrition behaviors, such as better food handling and preservation. Feed the Future is integrating nutrition and agriculture programming to increase people’s access to diverse and quality foods and share nutrition practices. Resilience programs in the semi-arid Eastern Region facilitate nutrition messaging to populations in these regions, which have the highest levels of malnutrition and suffer from the effects of prolonged drought.

Scaling Innovations. Feed the Future is working to expand innovative, market-driven solutions that improve food security and nutrition in Kenya. Part of this work involves scaling up the use of technologies and practices that benefit smallholder farmers, including:

  • Integrated pest management
  • Orange-fleshed sweet potato
  • Solar-powered refrigeration for livestock vaccines
  • Nearly 935,000 farmers and other producers used new technologies and management practices for the first time last year with Feed the Future’s help.
  • Producers applied improved technologies and management practices on more than 34,500 hectares of land with Feed the Future’s help last year.
  • Feed the Future-supported farmers and producers increased the value of their agricultural product sales last year by more than $14 million .
  • Feed the Future leveraged more than $23

Results by the numbers

  • Nearly 935,000 farmers and other producers used new technologies and management practices for the first time last year with Feed the Future’s help.
  • Producers applied improved technologies and management practices on more than 34,500 hectares of land with Feed the Future’s help last year.
  • Feed the Future-supported farmers and producers increased the value of their agricultural product sales last year by more than $14 million .
  • Feed the Future leveraged more than $23 million in new private investment in food and agriculture in Kenya.
  • U.S. Government programs reached more than 2.6 million children under 5 years old to improve their nutrition.

Key achievements in 2014

  • Feed the Future-supported farmers increased gross margins per dairy cow by 140 percent, from $371 in 2013 to $893 for 88,047 cows. The amount of milk each cow yielded increased by 72 percent, from 5.4 liters per cow per day in 2013 to 9.3 liters.
  • By co-investing with the private sector, Feed the Future enabled 1,048 farmers to plant 216 hectares of yellow passion fruit and harvest 143 metric tons of the fruit, valued at $2 million.
  • Feed the Future helped 64,036 pastoralist households develop community development action plans that have enabled communities to access more than $12 million in non-program public and private investment in market, water, health, education and other infrastructure.
  • Kenya experienced a 40 percent increase in the value of livestock in counties targeted by Feed the Future’s value chain programs in the northern arid lands.
  • Feed the Future helped three counties develop individual County Investment Plans, each with a focus on agriculture.

These results reflect data from USAID, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Peace Corps, U.S. African Development Foundation and U.S. Department of the Treasury (through the International Fund for Agricultural Development and Global Agriculture and Food Security Program) reported into Feed the Future’s central monitoring system for FY14. For more information on the indicators above, please view our FY14 Feed the Future progress report. All dollar amounts are in listed in U.S. dollars.

Agriculture is central to the Government of Kenya’s development strategy and Kenya’s economy. In 2010, Kenya signed a Comprehensive Africa Agriculture Development Program compact to prioritize agricultural development. The Government of Kenya has also established a National Food and Nutrition Security Policy to provide an overarching framework to address poverty, hunger and undernutrition.

In 2013, the Government of Kenya’s constitution called for devolution of governing authorities to a county-based system. Since implementation, Feed the Future has continued to work closely with its national government counterparts while also building strong relationships with county governors. The partnerships at all levels provide a unique opportunity to work across the scope of agriculture at both the national and more localized county levels simultaneously for a more holistic approach to agricultural development.

With the right incentives, opportunities exist to increase agricultural productivity as young entrepreneurial farmers enter the sector and embrace the use of technology to transform subsistence agriculture to commercial operation. Private investment is driving agricultural expansion; addressing blockages in key agricultural value chains can spur further growth.

Looking for opportunities to work in our Feed the Future countries? Visit the opportunities tabs on our Research and Civil Society pages.

If you’re a private sector company interested in a partnership with Feed the Future agencies in the areas of food security and nutrition in Kenya, use our interactive online tool to learn more, register your partnership ideas with us, and get connected to a partnership expert who can help address your interest.

Source: www.feedthefuture.gov

Category: Bank

Similar articles: