How much is a convertible bentley


Although Bentley had nothing to say about possible plans to put the Grand Convertible in production, the concept looks ready to hit the assembly line and we have reason to believe the Brits are finally rolling out a replacement for the Azure. We’ll be on the lookout to find out more about what Bentley intends to do with it, but in the meantime let’s have a closer look at the Grand Convertible or the company’s first full-size cabriolet in five years.


The latter doesn't include the Mulsanne's fog lamps, but they might as well appear on a production model.

Although it doesn’t wear the Mulsanne moniker, the Grand Convertible is all Mulsanne when it comes to styling. Sure, it misses the rear doors and it sports a shorter wheelbase, but, other than that, the Grand Convertible is a Mulsanne front to rear. The front fascia is essentially identical. The headlamp configuration, the massive front grille and the bumper are exactly the same. The latter doesn’t include the Mulsanne’s fog lamps, but they might as well appear on a production model. The same goes for the rear end and the sides, with nearly every single detail found on the Mulsanne seen on the convertible as well, including the side-sill chrome strips, the door handles, the side mirrors or the sculpted rear fenders.

Things are a bit different when it comes to the exterior paint. Finished in Sequin Blue, a striking, bespoke color not available with the regular Mulsanne, the Grand Convertible had its hood and windscreen frame painted in silver. The approach is quite similar to what Rolls-Royce does with most of its vehicles, including the Phantom Drophead Coupe, which usually features a silver hood to go with the massive chrome grille.

Rounding off the concept’s unique look is a set of five-spoke wheels polished to a high shine.


Most of the dashboard is made from

dark-stained Burr Walnut, as are the top of the doors and the rear deck.

The Grand Convertible’s interior is downright impressive. The Brits used no less than 14 naturally tanned leather hides throughout the cabin, as well as a unique diamond quilting layout on the seats and the door panels. Bright-blue inserts and Sequin Blue stitching adds a dash of color to the otherwise light-colored interior.

Most of the dashboard is made from dark-stained Burr Walnut, as are the top of the doors and the rear deck. The latter, which also features a mirror finish and chrome inserts is the largest piece of wood veneer ever applied to a Bentley vehicle. Much like the exterior, the interior also looks production ready, albeit massively expensive considering the amount of luxury amenities.


Motivating the Grand Convertible concept is the same twin-turbocharged, 6.75-liter, V-8 engine found in the Mulsanne four-door and other Bentleys. The output, however, suggests the Brits went for slightly tweaked version that debuted in the Mulsanne Speed, a strategy that makes a lot of sense considering the Grand Convertible is supposed to be sportier than its four-door siblings.

Specifically, the said V-8 cranks out 530 horsepower and a massive 811 pound-feet of torque at only 1,750 rpm. That’s more torque than you get with the Mercedes

-Benz S65 AMG or the Koenigsegg CCX. In fact, the Grand Convertible is right on par with the Koenigsegg Agera at 811 pound-feet. Amazing!

Bentley did not release any performance specs for the concept car, but considering the Mulsanne Speed needs 4.8 seconds to charge from naught to 60 mph, we figure the Grand Convertible should be able to hit 60 mph in about the same time. Top speed is likely set at 190 mph, making this car one of the fastest luxury convertibles. One more reason for Bentley to turn the concept into a production vehicle.

Drivetrain Specifications


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