Modern U.S. Proof Set Values

how much is my silver coin worth

How Much Is My U.S. Proof Set Worth?

By James Bucki. About.com Guide

Image Courtesy of: The United States Mint, www.usmint.gov

This guide will give you an idea of how much your proof set issued by the U.S. Mint, made from 1936 through today, is worth. The table listed below provides average coin values based upon current market conditions. This guide assumes that all sets are in original U.S. Mint packaging, boxes and all original documents and Certificates of Authenticity (COA) are included. The sets should be free from damage and the coins must have never been circulated. If you want to know how much you should pay a coin dealer to purchase a proof set, then consult the U.S. Proof Set Price Guide .

Introduction to Coin Values

There are many factors that go into determining the value of your coins. First of all you must understand how the coin market works. If the coin dealer runs out of 1955 proof sets, he cannot just call the mint and order more of them because the mint does not make coins dated 1955 anymore. The coin dealer must replenish his supply by buying proof sets from other dealers or people who walked into his store. What he pays you for that coin is known as the "wholesale price " or "value . " If you want to buy that 1955

proof set from the coin dealer, that is known as the "retail price " or "price ."

Key Dates, Rarities and Varieties

The following proof sets in any condition, are worth considerable more than common proof sets. As such, these coins are frequently counterfeit or altered from common coins. Therefore, before you start celebrating your early retirement with your new found fortune, have the coins authenticated by a reputable coin dealer or third party grading service .

  • All proof sets dated 1936 - 1951
  • 1971-S No S Jefferson 5-cent (the Jefferson nickel is missing the mintmark "S" on the obverse )
  • 1981-S Clear S (all mintmarks on all coins have a very clear and flat mintmark)
  • 1990-S No S Lincoln cent (the Lincoln penny is missing the mintmark "S" on the obverse below the date)

Modern U.S. Proof Set Coin Values

The following table lists the value (what you can expect a dealer to pay you ) for your proof sets. The first column lists the date and type followed by some information about the set and the last column lists the average value that a coin dealer will pay to you. These are approximate values and the actual offer that you will receive from a particular dealer will vary depending on the actual grade of the coins and a number of other factors.

Source: coins.about.com

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