Repair Credit Canada

how to repair credit in canada

Equifax Inc. is a consumer credit reporting agency in the United States, considered one of the three largest American credit agencies along with Experian and TransUnion.

Equifax Inc – also in canada

Experian – also in Canada – no credit report

Experian has discontinued consumer credit reporting in

Canada and they are no longer able to respond to requests

from consumers or creditors.

TransUnion – also in canada

A credit bureau or consumer reporting agency (United States), or credit reference agency (United Kingdom), credit reporting body (Australia) is a company that collects information from various sources and provides consumer credit information on individual consumers for a variety of uses. It is an organization providing information on individuals’ borrowing and bill-paying habits.

Credit information such as a person’s previous loan performance is a powerful tool to predict his future behavior.

This helps lenders assess credit worthiness, the ability to pay back a loan, and can affect the interest rate and other terms of a loan.

Consumers with poor credit repayment histories or court adjudicated debt obligations like tax liens or bankruptcies will pay a higher annual interest rate than consumers who don’t have these factors.

In the United States, 90% of credit reports provided by credit bureaus contain inaccuracies. According to the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO), common causes of errors broadly fall into one of two categories: inclusion of incorrect information and exclusion of correct information.[9] Reasons for the inaccuracies include consumers providing inaccurate information to the credit bureaus; incorrect or incomplete data input by furnishers, or failing to provide data to the credit bureau; and incorrect or incomplete data (or data applied to the wrong consumer) by the credit bureau.[9] According to Avery, Calem, and Canner in Credit Report Accuracy and Access to Credit, “the parties that bear the costs of correcting errors or providing more timely and complete information [data furnishers and credit bureaus] may not receive much benefit from the improvement in accuracy.”.

Separately, they’ve compiled nationwide computer databases of credit information on millions of Canada citizens. Credit reports are available to their subscribers instantly, over computer networks.

Credit Score

A credit score is a numerical expression based on a level analysis of a person’s credit files, to represent the creditworthiness of the person. A credit score is primarily based on

a credit report information typically sourced from credit bureaus.

Lenders, such as banks and credit card companies, use credit scores to evaluate the potential risk posed by lending money to consumers and to mitigate losses due to bad debt. Lenders use credit scores to determine who qualifies for a loan, at what interest rate, and what credit limits. Lenders also use credit scores to determine which customers are likely to bring in the most revenue. The use of credit or identity scoring prior to authorizing access or granting credit is an implementation of a trusted system.

Credit scoring is not limited to banks. Other organizations, such as mobile phone companies, insurance companies, landlords, and government departments employ the same techniques.


Canada –  credit reports and scores

The system of credit reports and scores in Canada is very similar to that in the United States, with two of the same reporting agencies active in the country: Equifax and TransUnion. (Experian, which entered the Canadian market with the purchase of Northern Credit Bureaus in 2008, announced the closing[5][6] of its Canadian operations as of April 18, 2009).

There are, however, some key differences. One is that, unlike in the United States, where a consumer is allowed only one free copy of their credit report a year, in Canada, the consumer may order a free copy of their credit report any number of times in a year, as long as the request is made in writing, and as long as the consumer asks for a printed copy to be delivered by mail.[7][8] This request by the consumer is noted in the credit report as a ‘soft inquiry’, but it has no effect on their credit score. According to Equifax’s ScorePower Report, Equifax Beacon scores range from 300 to 900. Trans Union Emperica score ranges from 300 and 900.

The Government of Canada offers a free publication called Understanding Your Credit Report and Credit Score.[9] This publication provides sample credit report and credit score documents, with explanations of the notations and codes that are used. It also contains general information on how to build or improve credit history, and how to check for signs that identity theft has occurred. The publication is available online at the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada. Paper copies can also be ordered at no charge for residents of Canada.


Category: Credit

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