Impaired and Problem Loans

what are impaired loans

Impaired Loans

Under IFRS. we consider loans to be impaired when we recognize objective evidence that an impairment loss has been incurred. While we assess the impairment for our corporate credit

exposure individually, we consider our smaller-balance standardized homogeneous loans to be impaired once the credit contract with the customer has been terminated.

As of December 31, 2008, our impaired loans totaled € 3.7 billion, representing a 39 % increase compared to December 31, 2007. The total € 2.1 billion net increase of impaired loans was only partly offset by € 990 million of gross charge-offs and a € 36 million decrease as a result of exchange rate movements. The increase in impaired loans is mainly attributable to our individually assessed impaired loans with net increases of € 1.2 billion, partly offset by gross charge-offs of € 364 million and a € 36 million decrease as a result of exchange rate movements. This development includes € 753 million of loans reclassified according to IAS 39, which during 2008

showed a net increase of € 944 million, partly offset by € 138 million of gross charge-offs and a € 53 million decrease as a result of exchange rate movements. The collectively assessed impaired loans increased by € 271 million, as net increases of € 896 million were offset by charge-offs of € 625 million.

Problem Loans

In keeping with SEC industry guidance, we continue to monitor and report problem loans.

Our problem loans consist of our impaired loans and, additionally, € 873 million nonimpaired problem loans as of December 31, 2008, where no impairment loss is expected but where known information about possible credit problems of borrowers causes management to have serious doubts as to the ability of such borrowers to comply with the present loan repayment terms or that are 90 days or more past due but for which the accrual of interest has not been discontinued.

The following table presents the components of our December 31, 2008 and December 31, 2007 problem loans and impaired loans.


Category: Credit

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