Oil & Gas companies account for more than a quarter of 2015 defaults

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The global corporate default tally climbed to 70 issuers after two U.S.-based exploration-and-productions companies triggered a default in the past week. Oil & Gas companies now account for more than a quarter of defaults so far this year, according to a report published by Standard & Poor’s on Friday.

SandRidge Energy entered into an agreement to repurchase a portion of its senior unsecured notes at a significant discount to par, prompting S&P to lower its corporate credit rating on Aug. 14 to D, from CCC+, on what the agency considers to be a distressed transaction and “tantamount to a default”.

Samson Resources failed to make the interest payments due on its $2.25 billion of 9.75% unsecured 2020 notes due Aug. 15. Standard & Poor’s subsequently lowered Samson’s corporate credit rating to D, from CCC-.

Of the 70 defaulting entities, 40 are based in the U.S. 14 in emerging markets, 12 in Europe, and 4 in the other developed nations. By default type, 22 defaulted due to missed interest or principal payments, 19 because of distressed exchanges, 14 reflected bankruptcy filings, seven were due to regulatory intervention, six were confidential defaults, one resulted from a judicial reorganization, and one came after the completion of a de facto debt-for-equity swap.

Standard & Poor’s Global Fixed Income Research estimates that the U.S. corporate trailing-12-month speculative-grade default rate will rise to 2.8% by March 2016, from 1.8% in March 2015 and 1.6% in March 2014. – Staff reports

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American Apparel raises going concern warning as losses deepen

Embattled clothing retailer American Apparel issued a going concern warning on Monday, stating once again that it may not have enough liquidity to continue its operations for the next 12 months amid deepening losses and negative cash flows.

American Apparel said in an SEC filing after yesterday’s close that it had reached an agreement with a group of lenders, led by Standard General, to replace its $50 million credit facility with a $90 million asset-based revolver, maturing April 4, 2018. Wilmington Trust replaces Capital One as the administrative agent, the filing said.

Despite the cash infusion, American Apparel further warned that if it is unsuccessful in addressing its near-term liquidity needs or in adequately restructuring its obligations outside of court, it “may need to seek protection from creditors in a proceeding under Title 11” of the US bankruptcy code.

Note the company has a $13 million interest payment on its 15% first-lien 2020 bonds in October.

Shares in the name fell 4% to 14 cents as at mid-morning on Tuesday, having lost more than 85% this year.

As reported, American Apparel said it had been in ongoing discussions with Capital One regarding a potential waiver in an effort to avoid a potential default, and as a result of these discussions, was unable to file its second quarter 2015 10-Q filing before the regulatory deadline.

According to yesterday’s filing, the company was not in compliance with the minimum fixed charge coverage ratio and the minimum adjusted EBITDA covenants under the Capital One Credit Facility. For the April 1, 2015 through June 30, 2015 covenant reference period, its coverage ratio was 0.07 to 1.00 as compared with the covenant minimum of 0.33 to 1.00, and its adjusted EBITDA was $4,110 compared with the covenant minimum of $7,350. The covenant violations were waived under the Wilmington Trust Credit Facility.

The retailer on Monday confirmed its second-quarter results, released on a preliminary basis last week. As reported, second-quarter net losses jumped 20% to $19.4 million, or $0.11 per share, from a loss of $16.2 million, or $0.09 per share in the year-ago period. This is the company’s 10th consecutive quarterly loss.

Revenue fell approximately 17% from the year-ago period, to $134 million.

Adjusted EBITDA for the three months ended June 30, 2015 was $4.1 million, versus $15.9 million for the same period in 2014. As of Aug. 11, 2015, American Apparel had $11,207 in cash.

As reported, the company said it has begun discussions to analyze “potential strategic alternatives,” which may include refinancing or new capital raising transactions, amendments to or restructuring

of its existing debt, or other restructuring and recapitalization transactions.

American Apparel is rated CCC- by Standard & Poor’s, with negative outlook. Its 13% senior secured notes due 2020 are rated CC, with a recovery rating of 5. Moody’s last week downgraded the company to Caa3 from Caa2, and placed the company under review for downgrade. – Rachelle Kakouris

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Loan defaults set to hit 6-month high with Samson Resources Ch 11 filing next month

The default rate of the S&P/LSTA Leveraged Loan Index will increase to 1.27% by principal amount next month, from 1.17%, when Samson Resources via Samson Investment Company files for bankruptcy. tripping a default on its second-lien secured loan. The default rate by issuer count will tick up to 0.77%, from 0.67%, according to LCD.

The default rate would be at a six-month peak, or the highest level since 3.79% as of March 31, although that was including Energy Future Holdings. which is no longer counted in the default rate due to the rolling-12-month basis. Excluding EFH, the default rate post-Samson would hit its highest level since February 2014 when it was 1.86%, according to LCD.

Privately held, KKR-controlled Samson on Friday announced publicly that it has entered into a restructuring support agreement with certain lenders holding 45.5% of the company’s second-lien debt, and with its sponsor on a proposed balance sheet restructuring that “would significantly reduce the company’s indebtedness and result in an investment of at least $450 million of new capital.”

Under the terms of the RSA, second-lien lenders, including Silver Point, Cerberus and Anschutz, have agreed to invest at least $450 million of new capital to provide liquidity to the balance sheet post reorganization and permanently pay down existing first-lien debt, the company said.

As a result, the company said it would not make the interest payment due today under its sole outstanding corporate issue, the $2.25 billion of 9.75% unsecured notes due 2020, but instead would use the 30-day grace period triggered by its non-payment “to build broader support for the restructuring and continue efforts to document and ultimately implement the reorganization transaction as part of a Chapter 11 filing.” The debt is worthless, trading below 1 cent on the dollar, down from around 30 in March, and a par context a year ago before the bear market mauling in oil.

The Samson loan default would not be particularly large, as the second-lien term loan was originally $1 billion in the Index. However, it’s notable as the second largest loan default this year, or since Caesars Entertainment kicked off the New Year in mid-January with the sixth largest default on record, at $5.36 billion across four tranches in the Index, according to LCD.

Assuming no other defaults leading up to Samson next month, it would become sixth loan-issuer default in the Index this year, following rival coal credits Alpha Natural Resources earlier this month, Patriot Coal in May, and Walter Energy in April, as well as exploration-and-production company Sabine Oil & Gas in April. Meanwhile, the eight ex-Index defaults this year are Altegrity. Allen Systems. American Eagle Energy. Boomerang Tube. Chassix. EveryWare. Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea. and Quicksilver Resources .

The shadow default rate for the Index is currently at 0.72%, down from 0.82% last month, but nearly triple the 0.29% rate in April. There is $5.51 billion of Index outstandings on the shadow list, and that includes Samson since its hiring of Kirkland & Ellis and Blackstone Group in February. This rate includes loans that are paying default interest but which are still performing, loan issuers that have bonds in default, and issuers that have hired bankruptcy counsel or that have secured a forbearance agreement.

There are five loan issuers on the shadow list that are publicly known. Beyond Samson, it’s Gymboree, Dex Media, Millennium Health, and Vantage Drilling. all of which are consulting advisors. – Matt Fuller

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Weekly clearing yields for bonds and loans as of Aug 13

Below are the rolling 90-day clearing yields for bonds and a rolling 30-day comparison between double-B and single-B loans and bonds.

Source: www.leveragedloan.com

Category: Forex

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