Where to buy a halfpipe

where to buy a halfpipe

Try before you buy: 4 foot Halfpipe Plans How to Video

STEP 1 INTRODUCTION:

In this video series we're going to demonstrate step-by-step all of the techniques needed to build a half pipe.

Now the halfpipe that we're going to be building in this video is actually part of a printed plans and dvd kit but this video is the full video that you'd get if you purchase the product.

So the half pipe that you see is what we'll be building, it's a four-foot mini half pipe, eight feet wide, twenty seven feet long and for feet high now there are plans to modify the ramp but in this video we're just going to build the ramp as seen here one of the features of this ramp is that it is portable if you build it according to the plans it will fold up into an eight by eight by four foot cube and that's great for storing in the winter or just whenever you want to put it anywhere.

A materials list of everything you'll need to buy to build the ramp is available on our website at easyhalfpipe.com, and then click on the downloads link you'll see right there once you have your materials tools and an area to build you're ready to start the transitions.

To watch the next step in building your ramp just click on the link in the video.

We hope these videos are helpful. For the whole kit including the step-by-step dvd, step-by-step manual, materials list and poster size blueprints including ramp mods like a six foot with vert, spines and more go to easyhalfpipe.com

STEP 2 TRANSITIONS:

Before you start construction be sure to read understand and follow all the safety instructions that come with your power tools.

First read and follow the ground preparation section of your plans. Then you can begin your transitions.

Two transitions are cut from one sheet of plywood and it should look like this. Scribe twenty inch line on a sheet of half-inch plywood using a two-by-four as a guide on this line measure sixteen inches from the edge of the plywood and place a mark there.

Next measure six feet up from the line and mark the axis point with the spike or a screwdriver if you're doing this on soil.

Tie one end of the string to a spike and the other end of the string to a pencil or marker the pencil should touch the twenty inch baseline when pulled tight.

Scribe the transition line by holding the pencil vertical and the string tight. This is one of the most important steps of building your ramp, be sure that the curve you draw is smooth scribe another line in the opposite corner from the first just as you did in step one.

With the plywood raised from the ground, cut out the transition. Be careful not to cut over the curved line.

Flip the newly cut transition over diagonally and trace the curved line using the first transition as a template.

Cut out the second sheet of plywood and discard the surfboard section.

On the second sheet of half-inch plywood cut out two more transitions using the first transition as a guide using the first transition ensures a more accurate duplication line up the four transitions and drive in three screws to hold them together along the transition edge mark the positions of the two-by-fours be sure each transition is marked remove the screws and lay the transitions on the ground in two groups and eight feet apart from each other.

Have an assistant hold up the unattached and until screws can support it.

Attach the studs to the transition using three inch screws to screws at each end of the stud.

We hope his videos are helpful for the whole kit including the step-by-step dvd step-by-step manual materials list and poster size blueprints including ramp mods like a six foot with vert, spines and more go to easyhalfpipe.com

STEP 3 TRANSITIONS:

Before you start construction be sure to read understand and follow all the safety instructions that come with your power tools. You start the flat bottom with two studs placed at the bottom of the transitions parallel to the transition studs then lay three studs between them, one at the center and the other two at the ends then four more studs are evenly placed you will not secure them at this point but it will give you an idea for the layout. Cut the seven studs to seven feet seven and one half inches the goal is to allow three-quarter inch overlap plywood on each end of the flatbottom. Once the two end studs are added group the two end studs together and transfer marks where the seven studs will be attached from the center of scrabble mark and at sixteen and thirty two inches in each direction. Now group the seven studs together, making sure that they are all aligned at the end. Measure and mark where the support studs will go. Each support stud needs to be staggered to allow for screws later there will be three support studs per section. Attach the end studs to the seven cut studs using two, three inch screws per end. It is extremely important that the joined studs are flush on top otherwise the plywood & masonite will be uneven. Now we will add the cross support studs measure cut each cross that individually and evenly placed three studs per section. Secure them with three inch screws at each end. Slide the transitions into the flat bottom frame. Using a "C" clamp will help eliminate gaps between the studs while you screw them together and again be sure that the studs are flush on the top. Attach the transitions to the flat bottom using twelve, three inch screws, one screw per section. Finally secure the plywood transitions to the flat bottom frame with three 2.5 inch screws.

STEP 4 PLYWOOD:

Before you start construction be sure to read understand and follow all the safety instructions that come with your

power tools.

Align a sheet of quarter-inch plywood on the center edge of the middle flat-bottom stud it should also overlap the center of the bottom transition stud.

To make it easy when driving screws mark the plywood at each stud and snap a chalk line from end to end along the seven studs.

Attach a one-inch screw to the corner end and drive screws every ten inches along each edge.

Then drive additional screws into the support studs every ten inches.

It is not necessary to drive screws into the short cross support studs.

Attach the second sheet of plywood in the same matter is the first.

Dry place a sheet of plywood at ninety degrees to the transition.

If your measurements were correct the top of the plywood should line up with the center of a transition stud.

If not it's not a problem, you have two options, 1: simply correct it by adding a stud at the required location or 2: remove the stud and reposition it so that the plywood overlaps halfway.

You'll also notice that the plywood overhangs each end of the transition about an inch and a quarter.

This is ok. You don't need to cut it off.

Quarter-inch plywood is fairly easy to bend along the transition as long as you're bending it along it's four-foot side and not the eight-foot side.

But if for some reason you're having trouble bending it, boil a pot of water and pour it on the plywood. Let it soak for about twenty minutes. It will be more flexible this way.

Mark and snap more chalk-lines along the transition plywood from end to end just like you did on the flat bottom.

Secure the transition plywood to the frame using one inch screws.

Dry place another sheet of plywood to the upper portion of the transition.

Again mark the center of the studs at each end of the plywood and one more at the top of the highest transition stud where the coping will be located.

You'll cut off the plywood past this

stud.

Remove the plywood and snap a chalk line between the two top marks,

then cut along the line.

Attach the top sheet of plywood to the

transition in the same manner as the

previous one.

Repeat these steps for both transitions.

STEP 5 MASONITE:

Sweep the ramp before installing masonite. This removes any loose screws or dirt.

Attach the flat bottom masonite to the plywood by marking and snapping chalk lines in the same manner as you attached the plywood to the frame.

Because masonite is very dense you will not be able to counter sink the screw heads as you did in the soft plywood.

You'll need to use a large drill bit or tool specifically designed to sink screw heads.

The screw heads must be flush with the masonite.

It may be tedious but it will save you a lot of scars. Add screws every ten inches or so.

The pieces of masonite that attach to the transitions do not attach at a ninety degree angle. They attach in the same position as the flat-bottom.

Dry place each sheet and mark the location of the studs as well as the top edge of the plywood where you will snap a chalk line and cut off the excess. Then screw into place as before.

To watch the next step in building your ramp just click on the link in the video.

We use masonite as a ramp surface because it's very affordable and is an excellent skating surface but it doesn't take water well at all.

If you're interested in alternatives to masonite for ramp surface materials just click on the link for that at the end of this video.

STEP 6 COPING:

Before you start construction, be sure to read understand and follow all the safety instructions that come with your power tools.

Cut out the corners of the transition with a jigsaw.

Dryplace the coping in the socket. Notice how much it overlaps the transition.

If it appears to stick out too far or not far enough for your taste, reposition the top deck stud either backward or forward. This will force the coping to move backward or forward as it rests in the socket.

With the coping in the socket line it flush with the end of the masonite. Mark the coping at the other end of the masonite and cut it to length. The length should be 8 feet.

Place the coping in the socket. Use a quarter-inch drill bit to make five evenly spaced pilot holes.

Attach the coping to the bottom stud using three-inch screws. Make the head of the screw flush with the exterior of the coping.

STEP 6 DECKS:

Before you start construction be sure to read understand and follow all the

safety instructions that come with your power tools.

With help of an assistant place a sheet of plywood on the deck flush with the coping.

Underneath, mark the corners where the transition plywood meets the top deck stud.

Flip the plywood over and place it on the ground.

Measure the distance from the four foot edge to the scribed line and with that same measurement make another mark at the back edge the plywood and join the two marks.

Measure the distance of the line that you just made and deduct half an inch.

With that measurement cut a 2X4 stud at that length and do the same thing for the other corner mark, following steps two and three.

Then attach both studs to the top side of the deck plywood using one inch screws.

The stud should be on the inside of the line and flush with the back edge of the plywood.

Measure the inside space between the two attached two-by-fours. Cut two studs that length.

Attach one stud to the ends of the first two with two three-inch screws at each end and attach it to the plywood using one inch screws.

Attach the second state in the same manner but with a thirty inch gap between the two.

Measure and cut three support studs and dry place them. You will secure than later.

Measure the height of the transition and cut three deck legs that length.

This measurements approximately forty four and a quarter inches.

Using a right angle attach the three deck legs with three three-inch screws per leg.

The center leg is attached midway between the two.

Now secure the three support beams with two three-inch screws per end. Space them evenly.

The center support beam will be off center because of the center deck leg.

Transfer the positions of the deck legs to a full length stud by laying it on top of the stud that secures the legs. Also mark and cut off the excess.

Measuring twelve inches from the end of the legs and using your markings as a guide.

Attach the stud to each leg with three inch screws.

The cross supports are measured by placing a stud on the underside of the deck plywood on the far side of the long support stud. Angle it down to meet the corner leg.

It should be touching the long support stud, the deck plywood, and the corner leg.

Mark a line where the cross beam overlaps the leg.

Use a right angle to be sure the leg is at ninety degrees to the deck while you draw the line and also when you attach it.

Secure the cross support stud with one three-inch screw to the deck leg, and three three-inch screws on the other end. Follow these same steps for the other cross support studs.

Flip the entire deck over and slip it into position between the two transitions.

Attach the deck plywood to the top deck support studs using several one inch screws about every ten inches or so.

To attach the transition plywood to the deck drive three one-and-a-half inch screws into the deck support beam on each side.

And that's it! Congratulations, we hope this video's been a great help to you.

Have fun skating!

We hope these videos are helpful.

For the whole kit including a

step-by-step dvd step-by-step manual

materials list and poster size

blueprints including ramp mods like a

six foot with vert, spines and more

Source: easyhalfpipe.com

Category: Forex

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