How can i go forward john lennon

how can i go forward john lennon

Comments: 83

Lest we forget. and it has never more clear than when I type this on the anniversary of John Lennon's death in 2011. "working class" covers everybody who gets up every day and works their butt off to pay their bills. Yes, some are richer than others and some work at jobs that are infinitely more appealing, but the fact remains that we live in a world where a very, very, very few fantastically wealthy people control most of the wealth and capital, while the rest of us, whether we mine coal or play basketball for the Lakers, fight over whichever scraps they feel like letting us have unless we are willing to try another path. With that in mind, if you want to take this song as a call for socialism or communism, so be it. I think John would be fine with that if he were here today. I also think if you took this song as a call for, perhaps, trying to make the world just a little bit better than the one we inherited, well, I think John would encourage that, too. And, of course, if you see this song as a call to break whatever bonds might be holding you back from being or doing whatever it is in this world that makes you happy, well, you can be certain he would encourage that, too. Ken - Philadelphia, Pa

Lest we forget. and it has never more clear than when I type this on the anniversary of John Lennon's death in 2011. "working class" covers everybody who gets up every day and works their butt off to pay their bills. Yes, some are richer than others and some work at jobs that are infinitely more appealing, but the fact remains that we live in a world where a very, very, very few fantastically wealthy people control most of the wealth and capital, while the rest of us, whether we mine coal or play basketball for the Lakers, fight over whichever scraps they feel like letting us have unless we are willing to try another path. With that in mind, if you want to take this song as a call for socialism or communism, so be it. I think John would be fine with that if he were here today. I also think if you took this song as a call for, perhaps, trying to make the world just a little bit better than the one we inherited, well, I think John would encourage that, too. And, of course, if you see this song as a call to break whatever bonds might be holding you back from being or doing whatever it is in this world that makes you happy, well, you can be certain he would encourage that, too. Ken - Philadelphia, Pa

Is it possible that Lennon's "Working Class Hero" is a warning for us all to be more than a little concerned about a Mac'consuming, all-star wrestling, NASCAR fan, gun-toting robot, NFL watching red-neck who wins the lottery or rescues a kitten and then thrust into the corporate media outlets as a hero/role model for the other mass-consumers? Un-awakened working-class people are immersed in the most un-healthy/un-wholesome environment imaginable and many carry the scars/baggage to prove it. Those of us who have awakened to our reality now what I'm talking about. and if Lennon wasn't enlightened, then we're all just existing in pens, waiting to be herded into the chutes leading to the slaughter house. John - Lompoc, Ca

1. "You think you're so clever and classless and free

But you're still f--king peasants as far as I can see" refers to how Americans think there free but they're not because they have to work so they can pay taxes to support their country.

2. Folks on the hill is obviously talking about capitol hill.

3. "If you want to be a hero, just follow me" means if you want to be considered a good person then do what everybody else does instead of be your self and think outside the box. In other words conform tov society David - Lakeland, Fl

Here's my interpretation of some of the lyrics.

"There's room at the top" would be more than just the wealthy but the obscenely rich, the politicians, the CEOs etc -the ruling class.

"But first you must learn to smile as you kill" reminds me of the idea of killing with a pen/signature, basically how the people at the top are responsible for wars and sending millions to their deaths, there are plenty of examples provided by Bush from the last decade, and no doubt more from Obama as they sell us these "necessary" wars.

"If you want to be like the folks on the hill" -Capital Hill, Washington maybe? was Lennon already over in the US by then, either way the imagery of the rich f***kers living or working on a hill fits with out a real world equivalent.

As

for if Lennon was working class and deserved to write this song, I'm not sure. I wasn't alive then, didn't know him personally, but either way, doesn't mean he can't be sympathetic towards them and the lyrics hold up regardless, my favourite and a reflection of my current time of life- "When they're tortured and scared you for twenty-odd years| Then they expect you to pick a career. " Daniel - Melbourne, Australia

"They hate you if you're clever and they despise a fool." John Lennon really nailed that one. Bob - Berkeley, Ca

Well, lets see.

Marilyn Manson did a version. it wasn't very good.

Ozzy Osbourne did a version. it was very good, it kind of seemed a little bit harder than Lennon's but softer than green day's. Mark - Bolton, Ma

"Working Class Hero" might have made an obscure reference to "Fool on the Hill" but the latter is a highly obscure song with little ostensible meaning. "Working Class Hero" has little obscurity. If it is an obscure reference, it is making fun of obscure lyrics in Paul's Beatles' songs while making a stark and obvious point. "On the hill" is where the rich and powerful live, as in Nachez on the hill. The only obscurities in this song are the lines "A working class hero is something to be," and "If you want to be a hero well just follow me."

Could it mean to transcend the bourgeois yearning to become rich by becoming cynical and hypocritical and to "smile as you kill," could it mean to be proud of who you are and to resist the idea that we cannot afford health care for all because your government is your enemy who spends and taxes too much? "Smile as you kill." We are all in this together and, to quote Jim Morrison in a similar vein, "no one here gets out alive." It may be that all we need is love, but it is a fact that all we have is each other. I do not think anyone really believes that keeping all their wealth is worth other people dying. Yet that is what the fools on the hill act like.

Frank Zappa poked fun at the Beatles in his 1968 album entitled, "We're only in it for the Money," which featured a mock cover reminiscent of the 1967 Sgt Pepper album cover. Of course, the point of that album is to critique self-righteously inflated bourgeois hypocrisy. It is full of contempt. In the song "What is the Ugliest Part of your body? he scoffs, "some says it's your nose, some say it's your toes, but I think it's your mind." The song Mother People contains the line: "We are the other people, You're the other people too, Do you think that I love you. stupid & blind?" That was the first song I remember having the word "f--king" in it and that was censored in most releases: "Better look around before you say you don't care, Shut your f--king mouth about the length of my hair, how would you survive, if you were alive; s--tty little person." Wikipedia recalls that the Beatles and Zappa had a sort of artistic dialogue in which Zappa's "concept albums" were an influence on the Sgt Pepper album. I think it is clear that John Lennon wanted to be much more than a rock star that was only in it for the money. I think Lennon took Zappa's critique to heart. I think a good case could be made that "Working Class Hero" is Lennon's response to Zappa's "Mother People," including the use of the word "f--king." The working class heroes are the other people; the ones who transcend the mold of bourgeois hypocrisy, self-righteousness, and the false dream of getting rich at the expense of others. That said, although I admire the raw contempt in Frank Zappa, John Lennon never forgot that we are all in it together and that all you need is love.

Ponder it. Right on! Daviid - Dc, Ga

I agree with Jim! John was the Working Class Hero and was the best ever! He was in all honesty the only Beatle to after the break-up tell how it was with no sugar coting he was amazing. He made people listen which most artist now can't get. Breanna - Henderson, Nv

I love The Beatles. I also love John Lennon. I would like a locket bearing his name:) Claire - Miller's, Md

Ok, folks on the hill DOES refer to the song the fool on the hill. John wrote this song because he believed in it. He wrote it to write it, there's no deep metaphorical meaning to it SO STOP LOOKING FOR ONE! Its just an amazing song written by the (in my correct opinion) best man in the world. Nothing more and nothing less.

P.S. Carly from San Diego, you're right and Dustin from IN, you don't make sense Nitalya - Plattsburgh, Ny

Source: www.songfacts.com

Category: Forex

Similar articles: