GCSE explanation of results

how to get new gcse certificates

From 1988 to 1993

  • The results of the GCSE exam were reported on a seven-point scale of grades: A(a), B(b), C(c), D(d), E(e), F(f) and G(g) of which grade A(a) was the highest and grade G(g) was the lowest.

Since 1994

  • The results have been reported on an eight-point scale of grades: A*(a*), A(a), B(b), C(c), D(d), E(e), F(f) and G(g).

Combined-Subject syllabuses

A syllabus (specification) which draws on two related subjects (the constituent subjects) to provide the basis for a single award GCSE. In reporting results, the following abbreviations are used in Combined-Subject syllabuses involving Design and Technology and Information Technology:

  • Design & Technology (D&T)
  • Information Technology (IT)

English and English Oral Communication from 1988 to 1993

  • Two results were reported for English. The first showed a performance in English, which was reported on the seven-point grade scale. The second showed a performance in Oral Communication, which was separately assessed and reported on a 5-point numbered scale, with grade 1 (one) indicating the highest level of attainment and grade 5 (five) the lowest level of attainment.

English and English Speaking and Listening

From 1996 to 2003 two results were recorded in English. A grade for English and a grade for the assessment of Speaking and Listening. Speaking and Listening was graded according to the standard GCSE grading scale.

To be graded on Speaking and Listening, a student must have obtained a grade G(g) or higher for English. The grade for Speaking and Listening was not a separate GCSE subject grade but represented an integral part of the overall assessment of GCSE English.

  • From 2004 to 2011 the subject was recorded singly as English on the certificate.
  • From 2012 to 2013 the subject was recorded singly as either English or English Language on the certificate.
  • From 2014 for all students other than those attending schools/colleges in Northern Ireland two results are recorded in English or English Language. A grade for English or English Language and a grade for the assessment of Speaking and Listening.

    Speaking and Listening is graded against a scale of 5-1, where 5 is the highest and 1 is the lowest grade available. The grade

    for Speaking and Listening is not a separate GCSE subject grade but represents an integral part of the overall assessment of GCSE English or English Language. For students attending schools/colleges in Northern Ireland the subject is recorded singly.

    Double awards

    • From 1988 to 2008 the results in these subjects were reported on the eight-point scale of grades A*A*(a*a*), AA(aa), BB(bb), CC(cc), DD(dd), EE(ee), FF(ff), GG(gg) of which grade A*A* was the highest and grade GG was the lowest. Results in these subjects have the same status as GCSE grades in two other single-certification subjects.
    • From 2008 the results in these subjects are reported on the 15-point scale of grades A*A*(a*a*), A*A(a*a), AA(aa), AB(ab), BB(bb), BC(bc), CC(cc), CD (cd), DD(dd), DE(de), EE(ee), EF(ef), FF(ff), FG(fg), GG(gg) of which grade A*A* is the highest and grade GG is the lowest. Results in these subjects have the same status as GCSE grades in two other single-certification subjects.

    Short courses

    The short course is designed to cover not less than half the specification content of the corresponding full GCSE subject course of study and the same grading standards are applied. The GCSE (short course) is, therefore, broadly equivalent to half the corresponding full GCSE.

    Grade comparison

    Grades A(a), B(b) and C(c) maintain the standards of the current GCSE grades A(a), B(b) and C(c), and the former CSE grade 1: grades D(d), E(e), F(f) and G(g) maintain the standards of the former CSE grades 2, 3, 4 and 5.

    Subject qualifications regulated by Ofqual

    The Office of Qualifications and Examinations Regulation (Ofqual) regulates qualifications, exams and assessments in England and vocational qualifications in Northern Ireland.

    From summer 2014, the symbol § on a certificate denotes where a subject qualification is not regulated by Ofqual.

    Ofqual regulate GCSEs that are available in England. This regulator does not regulate any modular GCSE qualifications or any linear GCSE English or English Language qualifications where speaking and listening assessments contribute to the grade awarded, which are available in other countries.

    For clarity, this means that all three of our regulatory bodies logos appear on all of our A-level and GCSE certificates, however Ofqual has not regulated those qualifications with results for:

    http://www.aqa.org.uk/exams-administration/about-results/certificates/aqa-certificates/?a=67785 how to get new gcse certificates

Source: www.aqa.org.uk

Category: Insurance

Similar articles: