What is Medicare Supplemental (aka Medigap) and How it Works

medicare how it works

Medicare Supplemental Coverage is known as “Medigap” for short. The reason for this is that it’s designed to provide insurance coverage for the “gap” between what Medicare pays and what the costs of a recipient’s actual services are. This difference is created by two factors: First, there are some medical services that Medicare doesn’t pay for at all. Second, there are some medical services that Medicare only pays for in part. So, the Medicare beneficiaries that do not carry any type of Medigap coverage are left responsible for the difference between those two amounts themselves.

Some people do not take advantage of Medigap coverage simply because they aren’t eligible to do so. There are certain requirements which must be met. For example, in order to enroll in Medigap coverage, a person must be enrolled in either part A or part B of Medicare. In addition, there are also some requirements surrounding the timing of one’s enrollment in a Medigap plan. There are two open enrollment periods: within six months of turning sixty-five and within six months of enrolling in Medicare part B. During those periods, such a person would be able to enroll in a Medigap plan without a medical screening. Any other time, a medical screening would be required.

There are ten different types of Medigap coverage, labeled A through N. Each of them has different specific benefits. In general, the higher the premium for any particular plan, the greater the level of benefits it offers; just as with any other type of insurance. Another thing these plans have in common with other types of insurance is the fact that they

change slightly from state to state. Since they are offered by private companies instead of the federal government, different states have different laws to regulate these plans, which accounts for the variances.

Since the inception of Medicare part D, no new Medigap policies sold include any type of prescription drug coverage. So, if you are purchasing a new Medigap policy now, you need to be aware of this. If you purchased your Medigap policy prior to January 1 2006, then you could have a plan which still includes prescription drug coverage. People who have switched to a stand-alone Medicare part D plan had the option to switch to a different Medigap plan altogether if they enrolled in that part D plan prior to May 15th of that year. Now, that freedom is left to the discretion of the issuing company, but you should still be able to drop your prescription coverage.

We and the licensed agents that may call you are not connected with or endorsed by the U.S. Government or the federal Medicare program. Medicare has neither reviewed nor endorsed the information contained on this website. This is not a complete listing of plans available in your service area. For a complete listing please contact 1-800-MEDICARE or consult www.medicare.gov (TTY users should call 1-877-486-2048), 24 hours a day/7 days a week or consult www.medicare.gov

The Website serves as an invitation for you, the customer, to inquire about further information regarding Medicare Supplement Insurance, and submission of your contact information constitutes permission for a representative to contact you with further information, including complete details on cost and coverage of this insurance.

Source: online-medicare-plans.com

Category: Insurance

Similar articles: