What is Fed OASDI/EE on a Paycheck?

Besides regular income tax, federal laws require your employer to collect Social Security and Medicare taxes separately and send in the money to pay for your coverage under these plans. OASDI is the government acronym for Old Age, Survivor and Disability Insurance, better known as Social Security.

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Some entries on your pay stub identify withholding amounts, such as "Federal Income Tax" or "Medicare," that are self-explanatory. Others, such as.

An employee's check stub should state his gross and net pay, plus various taxes withheld such as Federal, State and Medicare. In.

What is Fed OASDI/EE on a Paycheck? What Are Federal OASDI/EE Taxes? What Is an OASDI/EE Fee on Payroll Tax? Comments You.

OASDI/EE fees are important things to know when doing payroll tax. Learn what OASDI/EE fees are on payroll tax with help from.

You may have noticed a deduction from your paycheck that is labeled FICA or OASDI. These deductions are for Social Security taxes.

The Old-Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance program is part of Social Security. The federal government charges a tax of 12.4 percent on.

What Is Fed Med/EE Tax? Comments You May Also Like. What Is Federal Tax Withholding? You're required to fill out a W-4.

OASDI Tax Definition. OASDI is a federal tax paid by all income earners in the U.S. If you are self-employed. Some.

There is no OASDI withholding for earnings beyond that amount. What is Fed OASDI/EE on a Paycheck? The deduction labeled OASDI/EE.

Finally, Puerto Rico's withholding is 0.3 percent of weekly wages. Benefit Amount. (OASDI), more commonly known as Social Security insurance.

What Is an OASDI/EE Fee on Payroll Tax? What Are the Benefits of Series EE Bonds? Comments. Related Ads. Check It Out.

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Source: ehow.com

Category: Insurance

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