What is stacked uninsured motorist coverage

what is stacked uninsured motorist coverage

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Definition

Stacked uninsured motorist coverage refers to combining multiple cars on one insurance policy. The uninsured motorist coverage protects the driver in an accident with another driver who doesn't have insurance or enough insurance to cover medical bills. The coverage only applies to bodily injury and is an additional part of the automobile insurance policy. The amount of the coverage depends on the number of vehicles you have on the policy.

Purpose

State-mandated uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage protects you from accidents such as a hit-and-run or major collision. The coverage, however, may not cover medical expenses related to you or your passengers' injuries or hospitalization. Stacked car insurance, however, can fully cover medical expenses --- especially if you have more than two cars on your policy.

Advantages

The primary advantage to stacking is increased coverage. When you have more than one auto without stacking, the coverage stays

the same for each car. For instance, $50,000 unstacked insurance policy with two cars only protects each car for that amount --- $50,000 each. The advantage of stacking the insurance policy increases the coverage. A $50,000 stacked insurance policy increases with the number of cars you have on the policy. Thus, if you have three cars on the policy, your coverage increases to $150,000 for each car. Another advantage of stacking insurance allows you to eliminate the gap between underinsured motorist coverage and your state-mandated policy.

Considerations

Stacking your car insurance may increase your premiums. Stacked uninsured motorist coverage isn't offered in every state; approximately 20 states allow you to stack car insurance coverage. Before deciding if the coverage is best for you, review your state laws or ask your car insurance agent to make sure it's an option. You may encounter higher fees if you want to transfer an unstacked policy into a stacked policy.

Source: ehow.com

Category: Insurance

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