How much is insurance for a motorcycle

how much is insurance for a motorcycle

How Much Is Motorcycle Insurance

  • What is the cost/price; What quantity
  • $20 at the door, $18 with a reservation, $15 for students

    Help: My Motorcycle Has Been in a Crash! (Insurance for Bikers)

    Before you throw your leg over your machine, you should know how to handle an insurance claim before you get into a crash. Are you properly insured? Do you think you have "full coverage"? (Incidentally, there is NO such thing as "full coverage!)

    This simple guide explains how to ensure you get compensated for your bike's damages and get back on the road with the wind in your hair rather being stuck a pile of useless, twisted metal in your garage. Plus, it explains how to properly insure your bike for all that additional chrome and custom parts -- you have heard of Custom Parts & Equipment Coverage (CPE), haven't you? Would you be surprised to learn that without it, a bike you think is worth $50K is only worth $25K on your insurance policy?

    I'll teach you in plain, simple language how to protect yourself BEFORE something bad happens. Don't be like the people who look at their bikes after a crash and say, "I wish I'd known about insurance before this happened."

    About the author:

    Christopher Dillingham has been an insurance adjuster since 2001, and he has handled hundreds of motorcycle crash claims.

    Before you throw your leg over your machine, you should know how to handle an insurance claim before you get into a crash. Are you properly insured? Do you think you have "full coverage"? (Incidentally, there is NO such thing as "full coverage!)

    This simple guide explains how to ensure you get compensated for your bike's damages and get back on the road with the wind in your hair rather being stuck a pile of useless, twisted metal in your garage. Plus, it explains how to properly insure your bike for all that additional chrome and custom parts -- you have heard of Custom Parts & Equipment Coverage (CPE), haven't you? Would you be surprised to learn that without it, a bike you think is worth $50K is only worth $25K on your insurance policy?

    I'll teach you in plain, simple language how to protect yourself BEFORE something bad happens. Don't be like the people who look at their bikes after a crash and say, "I wish I'd known about insurance before this happened."

    About the author:

    Christopher Dillingham has been an insurance adjuster since 2001, and he has handled hundreds of motorcycle crash claims.

    Las Vegas

    August 19, 2005

    Inspired to compete

    Valley woman entering triathlon to honor officer killed in accident

    By Mary Manning

    LAS VEGAS SUN

    WEEKEND EDITION

    August 20-21, 2005

    Melissa Lardomita plans to endure as much as she can to try to help a family that has to endure more than any family should.

    Lardomita, a Metro Police corrections officer, is training for a triathlon Nov. 13 in Southern Nevada to honor and raise funds for the family of a fallen colleague.

    On May 29, on his last day of training before becoming a police officer, 26-year-old Freddy Hernandez headed home on his Harley-Davidson, which was a graduation gift from his wife. Blocks away from his home, Hernandez was killed when he struck the rear of a tanker truck turning right off Vegas Valley Drive into a water treatment plant, police said.

    Lardomita has set a goal of raising $25,000 for Hernandez Family Contribution Fund when she participates in the Nevada Silverman Full Distance Triathlon this fall.

    "I want to raise this money for pre-paid college tuition for his kids and to help her pay the bills," Lardomita said.

    Hernandez left two children, 6-year-old son Angel and 1-year-old daughter Laura behind as well as his wife, Lizette, said Lardomita, who befriended Lizette.

    "I didn't want him to ride, but oh, my God, he loved them," Lizette Hernandez said of her husband's attraction to motorcycles.

    When he died, Hernandez had been within two weeks of having life insurance coverage in place.

    "That was our next step," said his widow, "especially with him riding a motorcycle."

    Metro has offered support, adopting her like a family member and helping her recover through the Police Protective Association, Hernandez said through her tears.

    "I've worked since I was 14 and now it's more important than ever for the kids," Lizette said of her job at Camden Property Management.

    "He and I were planning our future together, and he always had a lot of goals," she said.

    Hernandez had served in the Marine Corps before attending the Metro Police academy.

    "Becoming a policeman was his dream," Lizette Hernandez said, describing how they fell in live and were sweethearts at Valley High School. They had been married almost seven years.

    After her husband died, Lizette said, she met Lardomita and was impressed with her determination.

    "She calls me all the time," Hernandez said.

    Participating in a full distance triathlon event has been Lardomita's dream.

    Lardomita is the daughter of a Hawaiian Ironman triathlete, who conquered the island's event 23 years ago, followed by a Cape Cod, Mass. triathlon a year later for another officer.

    Her father, Carl Thomas, a retired police officer in Windsor, Conn. inspired her to become a police officer and a triathlete.

    "Dad has always been athletic," she said.

    "It's because as long as I can remember I have always looked up to my dad," Lardomita said.

    The entire town of Windsor came to the airport after Thomas completed his first triathlon, she said.

    Thomas was ready to stop participating in triathlons after Hawaii until he heard of an officer killed in the line of duty in East Hartford, Conn.

    "He said to me, 'He can't go to work every day to support his family. I can do another triathlon,' " Lardomita said.

    When she told her father about trying to raise $25,000 for the Hernandez family, she was surprised to learn that he had raised the same amount in the 1983 Cape Cod triathlon.

    Lardomita said she'll train six hours a day for 16 weeks in preparation for the triathlon.

    She got her first sponsor, Tony's Pizza II, located at the corner of Horizon Ridge and College Drive in Henderson, last week.

    The Nevada Silverman Full Distance Triathlon is in its inaugural year, making history by celebrating the 100-year birthday of Las Vegas.

    Lardomita will attempt to complete a 2.4-mile swim in Lake Mead that begins and ends in Hemenway Harbor,

    a 112-mile bike course around the lake and through Henderson and a 26.2-mile run through Henderson.

    The Nevada Silverman Triathlon is believed to be the longest, most difficult single day event for individual athletes to ever take place in Nevada, said Trish Gumina, a spokeswoman for the event.

    A portion of the event's proceeds will benefit Project Sunshine, a nonprofit organization that provides free programs and services to children with life-threatening illnesses.

    Despite training long hours, Lardomita said she still puts her children first.

    "No. 1, I'm a mom," she said. "With the training, I have to take a step back and make sure my kids are No. 1."

    Eleven-year-old daughter Taylor, 8-year-old daughter Mia and 3-year-old son Isaiah enjoy watching mom ride the stationary bicycle in the backyard of their Green Valley home and spending summer days with her before she goes

    Day 811

    Apr 21 2009 Emotional I spent all day in the acute part of the ER and, unlike before, today was a really emotional day. Actually, it started off pretty dull except for this one guy who had really high blood pressure and a headache. He had lost his health insurance two years ago and hadn't seen a doctor or taken his high blood pressure medicine since then. His blood pressure was so high we were worried he had burst a vessel in his brain causing the headache. While I was talking to him he was good humored and strong, discussing everything that was going on. But as soon as his daughter was mentioned, he started tearing up. He was scared. I let him know that we were going to take good care of him and make sure he wasn't bleeding and help him lower his blood pressure, but I also repeated tens of times that he has to follow up regularly with primary care to get that blood pressure under control. Taking two pills every day can significantly reduce the risk of another 48 hour visit to the ER. To rule out a bleed we always do a CT and an LP (cat scan and spinal tap). The CT was normal so I went ahead and did the lumbar puncture. Unfortunately I was unable to get any fluid, despite multiple attempts and causing quite a bit of pain. The attending had the resident do the LP, this time with the patient sitting, and he got it on the first try. Man, I felt dumb. I felt so incompetent that I couldn't get over it for about an hour. But then the patient was so amazingly kind to me and he thanked me so much for talking to him and reassuring him, that I knew I was meant to be a doctor even if sometimes I can't get a procedure right. He was fine and went home with medicine and an appointment. But that was just the beginning of the day. Next came a patient from "forensic psychiatry" (I think it is an institution for mentally ill criminals). At first she was yelling at everyone, sticking her tongue out, and telling us to leave her alone. The doctor was able to talk to her finally and convinced her that we had to do a 30 second test that would slow her heart and tell us why it was beating so fast. He warned her that it would feel uncomfortable and she got scared. She asked me to hold her hand. And I did. I always do. Once the 30 seconds ended, she was really thankful and started telling me about her life. She had been to Woodstock and done drugs and all sorts of interesting things. I had to cut her off, though, because we had a trauma coming in. Drunk guy + bicycle. We got him checked out, set up, and left him to wait for CT and to sober up. Then another trauma came in, an Asian lady, almost 100 years old, found down by her family. She wasn't opening her eyes or speaking. She was checked out, set up, and then we left her to wait for CT. As I was putting her clothes away, a wad of money fell out of her pocket. She was holding hundreds of dollars in her pocket. I got really concerned and didn't want anything to happen to it so I alerted her nurse. We put the money back in the pocket and in a labeled paper bag as usual to not draw attention to it. The nurse and I put the bag on the bed and kept an eye on it. Then I noticed that the patient was trying to cover herself up but all she had was a sheet. I brought over two blankets. Then I went over to check on drunk bicycle dude and I found him lying in a puddle of water?/saline?/urine. No one was around, no one was checking on him. So I found two NAs and together we rolled him and dried him and changed his sheets. I told him next time he was soaked to yell for a nurse. He said gracias. I went back over to the older lady and her daughter had arrived. The nurse gave her the paper bag, explaining what was inside, and had her sign for the contents. The patient was surprised at what her mother had with her but was thankful for us keeping it safe. She told us that she was always taught that if you go to the hospital, you lose everything, your wallet, watch, glasses, etc. She said she was glad that was not true. Then the nurse left and I stayed with the daughter answering her questions. She had so many questions and mostly I said that I don't know. I explained the step by step approach we use to find out why she fell and if anything was wrong with her, but otherwise I just told her to be patient. Then I noticed that the patient's arm was uncovered so I covered it up. Somehow that made the daughter thank me profusely and she started explaining how her mother gets cold very easily and needs someone to keep her warm. I've already written a lot and so much more happened today that I could say. I haven't talked about the man who got paralyzed from the chest down who came in with his wife and brother-in-law that we ended up having to intubate. I haven't mentioned the lady who fell two days ago and was seen at an urgent care center and sent home, only to have a huge bleed in her head, who we had to intubate as well. I haven't mentioned the lady who came in after fainting the day afte

    how much is motorcycle insurance

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    Category: Insurance

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