How do i get a car tax refund

how do i get a car tax refund

Answers

Best Answer: You have to be really careful. Just prior to the 2005 tax season, the IRS got a lot stricter with donated vehicles. Now, you must have the taxpayer identification number of the organization or the exact name of the firm that takes your car, if the fair market value is 500 or more. It's either going to his social security number or, in the case of agencies and charitable organizations the employer identification number . Notice these:

Deduction more than $500. If you donate a qualified vehicle to a qualified organization and you claim a deduction of more than $500, you can deduct the smaller of:

The gross proceeds from the sale of the vehicle by the organization, or

The vehicle's fair market value on the date of the contribution. If the vehicle's fair market value was more than your cost or other basis, you may have to reduce the fair market value to figure the deductible amount, as described under Giving Property That Has Increased in Value, later.

Form 1098-C. You must attach to your return the copy of the Form 1098-C, Contributions of Motor Vehicles, Boats, and Airplanes, (or other statement containing the same information as Form 1098-C) you received from the organization. The Form 1098-C (or other statement) will show the gross proceeds from the sale of the vehicle.

If you do not attach Form 1098-C (or other statement), you cannot deduct your contribution. You must get Form 1098-C (or other statement) within 30 days of the sale of the vehicle. But if exception 1 or 2 (described next) applies, you must get Form 1098-C (or other statement) within 30 days of your donation.

Exceptions. There are two exceptions to the rules just described for deductions of more than $500.

Exception 1—vehicle used or improved by organization. If the qualified organization makes a significant intervening use of or material improvement to the vehicle before transferring it, and you claim a deduction of more than $500, you generally can deduct the vehicle's fair market value at the time of the contribution. But if the vehicle's fair market value was more than your cost or other basis, you may have to reduce the fair market value to get the deductible amount, as described under Giving Property That Has Increased in Value, later. The Form 1098-C (or other statement) will show whether this exception applies.

Exception 2—vehicle given or sold to needy individual. If the qualified organization will give the vehicle, or sell it for a price well below fair market value, to a needy individual to further the organization's charitable purpose, and you claim a deduction of more than $500, you generally can deduct the vehicle's fair market value at the time of the contribution. But if the vehicle's fair market value was more than your cost or other basis, you may have to reduce the fair market value to get the deductible amount, as described under Giving Property That Has Increased in Value, later. The Form 1098-C (or other statement) will show whether this exception applies.

This exception does not apply if the organization sells the vehicle at auction. In that case, you cannot deduct the vehicle's fair market value.

Example.

Anita donates a used car to a qualified organization. She bought it 3 years ago for $9,000. A used car guide

shows the fair market value for this type of car is $6,000. However, Anita gets a Form 1098-C from the organization showing the car was sold for $2,900. Neither exception 1 nor exception 2 applies. If Anita itemizes her deductions, she can deduct $2,900 for her donation. She must attach Form 1098-C and Form 8283 to her return.

Deduction $500 or less. If the qualified organization sells the vehicle for $500 or less and exceptions 1 and 2 do not apply, you can deduct the smaller of:

$500, or

The vehicle's fair market value on the date of the contribution. But if the vehicle's fair market value was more than your cost or other basis, you may have to reduce the fair market value to get the deductible amount, as described under Giving Property That Has Increased in Value later.

If the vehicle's fair market value is at least $250 but not more than $500, you must have a written statement from the qualified organization acknowledging your donation. The statement must contain the information and meet the tests for an acknowledgment described under Deductions of At Least $250 But Not More Than $500 under Records To Keep, later.

IR-2005-149, Dec. 22, 2005

WASHINGTON — Internal Revenue Service officials today reminded taxpayers that they must obtain a charity’s written acknowledgment of their vehicle donation before they claim a deduction for the donation. For deductions of more than $500, the taxpayer is required to attach the acknowledgment to the taxpayer’s return for the year of the donation.

However, a taxpayer cannot take a charitable contribution deduction of $500 or more for a vehicle donation unless the taxpayer has received a written acknowledgment of the donation from the charity and attached the acknowledgment to the return.

If the taxpayer receives the written acknowledgment after filing the tax return for the year of the donation, the taxpayer may, after receiving the acknowledgment, file an amended return for that year and claim the deduction on the amended return. The taxpayer must attach the acknowledgment to the amended return.

Next year , if the claimed value of the donated motor vehicle, boat or plane exceeds $500 and the item is sold by the charitable organization, the taxpayer is limited to the gross proceeds from the sale.

Under the new rules, the charitable organization must provide an acknowledgement to the donor within 30 days of the sale stating the amount of gross proceeds. Alternatively, if the charity significantly uses or materially improves the vehicles, the charity must certify this intended use and duration and provide an acknowledgement to the donor within 30 days of the contribution. If the charity significantly uses or materially improves the vehicle, generally, the donor may deduct the vehicle’s market value.

Also, check publication 78 to see if the charitable organization is qualified. Type in "publication 78" on the IRS website to see if the organization is qualified.

The IRS also reminds taxpayers to keep appropriate records to substantiate the value of their gifts. For example, for any single gift of $250 or more, a taxpayer must have a written acknowledgement from the charity by the earlier of the date the person files the tax return or the filing deadline, including extensions. A person donating property valued at more than $5,000 must obtain a qualified written appraisal.

Source: answers.yahoo.com

Category: Taxes

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