FAQ: How are LLCs taxed?

how llcs are taxed
  • April 19, 2013
  • Andrew Presti
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An LLC (limited liability company) is not a federal tax entity. LLCs are organized under state law. LLCs are not specifically mentioned in the Tax Code, and there are no special IRS regulations governing the taxation of LLCs comparable to the regulations for C corporations, S corporations, and partnerships. Instead, LLCs make an election to be taxed as a particular entity (or to be disregarded for tax purposes) by following the check-the-box business entity classification regulations. The election is filed on Form 8832, Entity Classification Election. The IRS will assign an entity classification by default if no election is made. A taxpayer who doesn’t mind the IRS default entity classification does not necessarily need to file Form 8832.

“Check-the-Box” Election

An LLC with more than one member can elect:

  • Partnership
  • Corporation
  • S corporation (accomplished by

    electing to be taxed as a corporation, then filing an S corporation election)

An LLC with only one member can elect:

  • Disregarded entity
  • Corporation
  • S corporation (accomplished by electing to be taxed as a corporation, then filing an S corporation election)

The IRS will assign these classifications if no entity election is filed for an LLC (the default rules):

  • any business entity that is not a corporation is classified as a partnership
  • any entity that is wholly-owned by a single person will be disregarded as an entity separate from its owner (taxed as a sole proprietorship).

Typically, an LLC with more than one member will elect to be taxed as a partnership, whereas a single-member LLC will elect to be disregarded and taxed as a sole proprietorship.

If you have any questions relating to LLCs, their benefits, drawbacks, or their treatment under the Tax Code, please contact our offices.

Source: pntax.com

Category: Taxes

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