How to Calculate Your Estate Tax Liability in 2015

how to calculate tax liability

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For an overview of current federal estate tax laws and charts showing the amount of the federal estate tax exemption and estate tax rates from 1916 through 2015, see the following:

  • Overview of Current Federal Estate Tax Laws
  • Federal Estate Tax Exemption Chart, 1916 - 1997
  • Federal Estate Tax Exemption Chart, 1997 - 2015
NOTE: This information is presented in a simplified format so that you can calculate a rough estimate of your estate tax liability. It should not be relied on for legal or tax advice. For legal advice, consult with an attorney. For tax advice, consult with a tax attorney or an accountant.

Determine the Value of Your Net Estate

The value of your gross estate is what is used as the starting point for determining your estate tax liability. Learn how to calculate an estimate of the value of your gross estate by reading the following:

From your gross estate the following can then be subtracted to give you the value of your net estate for estate tax purposes:

  1. Debts and expenses. including mortgages, lines of credit, personal loans, credit card debt, funeral expenses and medical bills; as well as administrative expenses to settle your estate or Revocable Living Trust. including attorney, accounting and appraisal fees, storage and shipping fees, insurances, and court fees; (Tip. To get a rough estimate of the administrative expenses, multiply your gross estate by 5%);

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  1. Charitable transfers. including direct gifts and property set aside in a Charitable Remainder Trust or Charitable Lead Trust ; and
  2. Transfers to a spouse who is a U.S. citizen. including outright transfers by right of survivorship and transfers made to a trust that qualifies for the unlimited marital deduction. such as the "A Trust " established when using AB Trust planning .

Determine Your Federal Estate Tax Liability in 2015

From your net estate is then subtracted your available federal estate tax exemption to arrive at your taxable estate.

Note that if you have

made any taxable gifts during your lifetime, then your available estate tax exemption will be equal to the difference between the total exemption available and the value of the lifetime gifts made.

Some Examples Using the 2015 Estate Tax Exemption and Rate

Here are some examples using the 2015 estate tax exemption and rate that should help you to understand how an estate tax bill is calculated.

Death in 2015, no lifetime gifts, taxable estate - If you die in 2015 and your gross estate is $6,000,000 and your allowable debts, expenses and deductions are $300,000, then your net estate is $5,700,000. You then subtract from your net estate your available estate tax exemption to arrive at your taxable estate. If you have not made any taxable gifts during your lifetime, then in this example your taxable estate will equal $270,000:

$5,700,000 net estate - $5,430,000 estate tax exemption = $270,000 taxable estate

Your taxable estate is then multiplied by 40% to arrive at your federal estate tax liability, which in this example equals $108,000 :

$270,000 taxable estate x 40% rate = $108,000 tax liability

Death in 2015, no lifetime gifts, nontaxable estate - Use the same facts above, except that your net estate is valued at $5,430,000. In this case, since your net estate is equal to the 2015 estate tax exemption, your taxable estate will be $0 and so your tax liability will be $0 :

$5,430,000 net estate - $5,430,000 estate tax exemption = $0 taxable estate

Death in 2015, $3,000,000 in lifetime gifts - Use the same facts above in #1, except that your death occurs in 2015 and you made $3,000,000 of taxable gifts during your lifetime. This means that the $3,000,000 in taxable lifetime gifts will be subtracted from your available estate tax exemption, leaving you with a $2,430,000 estate tax exemption:

$5,430,000 exemption - $3,000,000 lifetime gifts = $2,430,000 exemption

Thus, your estate tax liability will be $1,308,000 :

$5,700,000 net estate - $2,430,000 available exemption = $3,270,000 taxable estate $3,270,000 taxable estate x 40% rate = $1,308,000 tax liability

Source: wills.about.com

Category: Taxes

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