How To Figure Federal Income Tax Withholding

how to figure federal tax withholding

There are several ways to figure federal income tax withholding.

Wage bracket tables. See section 13 for directions on how to use the tables.

Alternative formula tables for percentage method withholding. See Publication 15-A.

Wage bracket percentage method withholding tables. See Publication 15-A.

Other alternative methods. See Publication 15-A.

Employers with automated payroll systems will find the two alternative formula tables and the two alternative wage bracket percentage method tables in Publication 15-A useful.

If an employee wants additional federal tax withheld, have the employee show the extra amount on Form W-4.

Supplemental wages. Supplemental wages are wage payments to an employee that are not regular wages. They include, but are not limited to, bonuses, commissions, overtime pay, accumulated sick leave, severance pay, awards, prizes, back pay and retroactive pay increases for current employees, and payments for nondeductible moving expenses. Other payments subject to the supplemental wage rules include taxable fringe benefits and expense allowances paid under a nonaccountable plan.

If you pay supplemental wages with regular wages but do not specify the amount of each, withhold federal income tax as if the total was a single payment for a regular payroll period.

If you pay supplemental wages separately (or combine them in a single payment and specify the amount of each), the federal income tax withholding method depends partly on whether you withhold federal income tax from your employee's regular wages.

If you withheld federal income tax from an employee's regular wages in the current or immediately preceding calendar year, you can

use one of the following methods for the supplemental wages.

Withhold a flat 25% (no other percentage allowed).

If the supplemental wages are paid concurrently with regular wages, add the supplemental wages to the concurrently paid regular wages. If there are no concurrently paid regular wages, add the supplemental wages to alternatively, either the regular wages paid or to be paid for the current payroll period or the regular wages paid for the preceding payroll period. Figure the income tax withholding as if the total of the regular wages and supplemental wages is a single payment. Subtract the tax withheld from the regular wages. Withhold the remaining tax from the supplemental wages. If there were other payments of supplemental wages paid during the payroll period made before the current payment of supplemental wages, aggregate all the payments of supplemental wages paid during the payroll period with the regular wages paid during the payroll period, calculate the tax on the total, subtract the tax already withheld from the regular wages and previous supplemental wage payments, and withhold the remaining tax from the current payment of supplement wages.

If you did not withhold federal income tax from the employee's regular wages in the current or immediately preceding calendar year, use method 1-b above. This would occur, for example, when the value of the employee's withholding allowances claimed on Form W-4 is more than the wages.

Regardless of the method that you use to withhold federal income tax on supplemental wages, they are generally subject to social security, Medicare, and FUTA taxes.

Source: irszilla.com

Category: Taxes

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