How to Go Green: Back To Basics

Top Back to Basics Tips

Ever since The Body Shop first hit the high street in the Eighties, there's been an increased awareness about the impacts of personal care products on both the environment and on our health. Fortunately, there has also been a huge increase in the number of companies providing more sustainable alternatives. Check out our guide to women's personal care and the Fashion and Beauty section, and stay tuned for a guide for the fellas. But remember, less is almost always more when it comes to green living--that hemp-based, yak's milk lip blusher may be the greenest product of its kind on the market, but going 'au natural' takes you one step further!

Many of us spend staggering amounts of money on furniture during our lifetime. Now most TreeHugger's will be aware that buying tropical hardwoods from Amazonian clear-cuts is a poor way to look after our natural heritage, but what are the alternatives? Fortunately, the industry is responding to concerns about its sourcing practices, and stylish furniture from certified, sustainably harvested and/or recycled and salvaged materials is becoming increasingly common. More details can be found in our furniture guide and in the Design and Architecture category.

Now you've spent all this time putting your house in order

with organic clothing and chemical-free furniture, why douse it in chemicals to keep it clean? Many everyday cleaning products are made up of pretty nasty constituents, yet there are natural alternatives that work just as well. Take a look at our How to Green Your Cleaning .

Back to Basics: By the Numbers

  • Five: Number of planets we would need if everyone lived like the average North American. If everyone lived like the average European, we'd need three. Unfortunately, we only have one.
  • 500 billion to 1 trillion: Plastic bags used by shoppers each year. This translates to about 150 bags a year for every person on earth. Remember to bring your own!
  • 83 percent: Percentage of Americans who now say global warming is a "serious" problem. This is up from 70 percent in 2004.
  • 941 and 1,023: Pounds of greenhouse gases added each year from one person eating three burgers per week.
  • 2.5 to 1: The ecological footprint of the average American, compared to that of the average Italian.

    Back to Basics: Getting Techie

    What is "sustainability"? tips on how to go green
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    Category: Taxes

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