2014 Federal Income Tax Brackets and Marginal Rates

Anyone who likes getting a look at their future tax expenses might be interested in seeing what next year’s tax brackets and tax rates will be. The IRS has now announced the official rates and brackets for 2014, although the numbers have been predicted for months because the IRS uses a simple process of inflation and somewhat round numbers to determine the brackets. Congress isn’t expected to make any changes to the tax laws this year, unlike the last several years when the question to continue Bush-era tax breaks needed to be addressed every year.

Keep in mind that the 2014 federal income tax brackets don’t matter to most people until they file their 2014 income tax returns in early 2015. That’s a long way off. But for those who pay estimated taxes for 2014 income throughout the year, the information doesn’t hurt. Chances are you’re getting ready to settle your 2013 income taxes, which will be due April 15, 2014. In that case, the rates and brackets you want to review are the 2013 rates and brackets. If you want to see how your income earned in 2015 is being taxed, view these tax brackets and marginal rates for 2015 .

Before getting to the numbers, keep in mind what marginal rates are. Your marginal rate is what you pay on your last dollar of income earned. If, for example, you will earn $50,000 in 2014, your marginal rate will be 25%. That does not mean you pay 25% on all of your income.

In fact, there is a strongly-held belief that the tax code penalizes people for earning more. I’ve heard people expressing disappointment

with receiving a bonus because it might push them into the next tax bracket. Yes, as you earn more money, you’ll owe more income tax (in general), but when you’re in a higher tax bracket, it doesn’t affect the tax you owe on income below that new bracket’s threshold. There’s no big jump — the higher tax rate applies only to the income you earn above the top bracket’s baseline.

(Employers have a funny way of withholding taxes on your bonus payment. but to the IRS, and in the end when you finally settle your tax bill, a dollar is a dollar whether it was earned as salary or bonus.)

There’s one instance when it does make sense to be concerned about receiving more income — when that income comes in the form of an asset that’s not very liquid. Here’s an example: In the rare circumstance you win a new car in a contest or sweepstakes, the value of that car must be treated as income. If you win a $60,000 car, you’re going to have to come up with more cash to pay taxes on that $60,000. This is one of the reasons many who end up winning these kinds of contests end up selling the prize.

The 2014 federal income tax brackets and marginal rates.

The federal income tax brackets and marginal rates have now been officially announced by the IRS. These were the rates predicted by Wolters Kluwer, CCH several months ago, based on the rate of inflation the IRS announced it would use in September. The Tax Foundation, a non-partisan tax research group based in Washington, D.C. has also shared the official information.

Source: www.consumerismcommentary.com

Category: Taxes

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