What home purchase costs are tax deductible

Kevin Carey

Tax Deductible Items for 2015 Mortgages

Congratulations on your mortgage closing! Here is a general overview of some information that may be helpful to you and your CPA as you prepare your 2015 tax returns:

Points Paid on a Home Purchase in 2015

Item 803 on the HUD-1 - If the adjusted origination charges on line 803 include points paid to your mortgage company in exchange for a lower interest rate, you can deduct those points in the year paid… even if they are paid by the seller.

Points Paid on a Mortgage Refinance in 2015

Item 803 on the HUD-1 - If the adjusted origination charges on line 803 include points paid to your mortgage company in exchange for a lower interest rate, you can deduct those points in the following manner:

  • You can deduct over the life of the mortgage all points paid on the portion of the mortgage proceeds that were not used for home improvements (for example, if you refinance your mortgage to reduce your interest rate, but do not take any cash out for home improvements).
  • You can deduct this year all points paid on the portion of the mortgage proceeds that were used for home improvements (if you received cash-out and are using that cash-out for home improvements). Remember, any points paid on the portion of the mortgage NOT used for home improvements must be spread out over the life of the loan. For example, assume you refinance an old $200,000 mortgage into a new $300,000 mortgage and walk away with $100,000 to be used for home improvements. In this case, 1/3 of your points are fully deductible this year and 2/3rds of your points are deductible over the life of the loan.
Property Taxes (actual and pro-rated)

Items 106 and 107 on the HUD-1 - Property taxes are generally deductible in the year they are paid. These are listed as items 106 and 107 on the HUD-1. Whatever you put into your escrow account for property taxes is listed as items 1004, 1005, or 1006 on the HUD-1. These are deductible in the year that your mortgage company pays them. Assessments are listed as item 108 on the HUD-1, and these are generally not deductible.

Pre-paid Interest

Item 901 on the HUD-1 - Mortgage interest is calculated in arrears. This means that your monthly mortgage payment actually

covers the month that just passed. For example, your February payment covers the interest for the month of January, your January payment covers the interest for the month of December, and so on. Oftentimes, when you refinance a mortgage or buy a new home, you “skip” a month’s worth of mortgage payments. That is why you sometimes pay “daily interest charges” on line 901 of the HUD-1 statement. These daily interest charges cover the interest for the current month. If your mortgage interest is deductible, then anything you pay on line 901 is also deductible (this will be included in the 1098 statement that you receive from your mortgage company).

You may be able to deduct the remaining portion of the original points paid on an old mortgage if you refinanced that old mortgage in 2015. For example, assume you paid points on a refinance transaction 3 years ago. You probably were not able to deduct all the points you paid in the year they were paid. Instead, you had to spread that deduction out over the 30-year life of your mortgage. So, assume you’ve deducted 3/30ths of those points so far, and you refinanced your mortgage again in 2015. You can now deduct the remaining 27/30ths of those old points that you have not yet deducted.

A pre-payment penalty paid on an old loan would be deductible on your 2015 tax returns as long as the new loan was taken out with a different lender than the old loan.

Other Closing Costs

Closing costs not mentioned above are not tax deductible. However, they are added to your “tax basis” for purpose of calculating your capital gain when you sell the property. In other words, you may be able to reduce your capital gains tax (if applicable) when you sell the property in the future because your home purchase closing costs get added to your cost basis.

Everything mentioned above pertains to a mortgage transaction involving a primary home or vacation home that is elected as a “qualified residence” for tax purposes. If your transaction involved an investment property, see IRS Publication 527 .

PLEASE NOTE: THIS ARTICLE AND OVERVIEW IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY AND DOES NOT CONSTITUTE LEGAL, TAX, OR FINANCIAL ADVICE. PLEASE CONSULT WITH A QUALIFIED TAX ADVISOR FOR SPECIFIC ADVICE PERTAINING TO YOUR SITUATION. FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ANY OF THESE ITEMS, PLEASE REFERENCE IRS PUBLICATION 936 .

Source: www.cmpsinstitute.org

Category: Taxes

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